ESRA 2013 Sessions

Sampling for cross-national surveysDr Matthias Ganninger
Cross-national surveys, like the European Social Survey (ESS), are being more and more frequently used by data users for substantial analyses.

To assure that the quality of the estimates obtained in these analyses is as high as possible, careful definition of sample designs in participating countries is important. An essential challenge at the planning stage lies in the comparative nature of most multi-national surveys: Achieving samples which yield estimates of comparable precision and low bias at low costs is in most cases a challenging task.

In this session, recent advances in the field of survey sampling for cross-national surveys and their application in real-world social surveys like the ESS, SHARE, PIAAC and others will be presented and discussed. The session aims to cover both, new methods of sampling and estimation techniques. The aim is to bring together basic research in the field of sampling and estimation as well as success stories of their application in compariative sample survey projects.

Surveying immigrants in the absence of a sample frame 1Dr Yana Leontiyeva
The aim of the proposed session is to attract contributions that address the methodological challenges posed by surveying respondents with immigrant-backgrounds, especially when an appropriate sample frame is not available. Conceptualising the sampling immigrants as a hard-to-reach population is relevant for (a) large national surveys that often underrepresent immigrants and (b) specific immigrant oriented surveys that often fail to produce data suitable for sophisticated statistical analysis.

The session welcomes contributions that address the following topics:

1) Use of innovative sampling methods like respondent-driven sampling, time-space sampling, quota sampling, random route sampling with focused enumeration, onomastic method in migration research.

2) Evaluations of survey data quality for immigrants in representative national and international surveys.

3) Presentation of particular immigrant surveys with a special focus on sampling techniques.


Surveying immigrants in the absence of a sample frame 2Dr Yana Leontiyeva
The aim of the proposed session is to attract contributions that address the methodological challenges posed by surveying respondents with immigrant-backgrounds, especially when an appropriate sample frame is not available. Conceptualising the sampling immigrants as a hard-to-reach population is relevant for (a) large national surveys that often underrepresent immigrants and (b) specific immigrant oriented surveys that often fail to produce data suitable for sophisticated statistical analysis.

The session welcomes contributions that address the following topics:

1) Use of innovative sampling methods like respondent-driven sampling, time-space sampling, quota sampling, random route sampling with focused enumeration, onomastic method in migration research.

2) Evaluations of survey data quality for immigrants in representative national and international surveys.

3) Presentation of particular immigrant surveys with a special focus on sampling techniques.


The Total Survey Error Paradigm: Design, Implementation and EvaluationMs Amanda Wilmot
The total survey error paradigm provides a theoretical framework for optimising surveys by maximising data quality within budgetary constraints. Total Survey Error (TSE) refers to the accumulation of all errors that may arise in the design, collection, processing, and analysis of survey data.

A panel of experts in survey methodology will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the TSE paradigm in response to a series of posed questions, drawing on their own experiences and using examples from different survey research organisations.

Panel:

Dr Paul Biemer, Center of Excellence for Complex Data Analysis, RTI International

Dr Fannie Cobben, Research Methodology Group, University of Wageningen

Professor Mick Couper, Survey Research Center and Joint Program in Survey Methodology, University of Michigan Institute for Social Research

Professor Peter Lynn, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex

Dr Ineke Stoop, European Social Survey/The Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP