ESRA 2013 Sessions

Data ArchivingMr Sebastian Kocar


Research Data Management for Re-use: Bringing Researchers and Archivists closer 1Dr Alexia Katsanidou
Research data management includes organizing, documenting and validating data to produce long-term re-usable data. Good research data management practice fulfills the King, et al. (1994: 8), requirement of social science that "procedures are public" to verify quality and permit replication. Accordingly, to the fullest extent possible the research community requires access to data and contextual documentation. Funding bodies impose archiving requirements on researchers, and data archives establish standards and procedures to ensure data are preservable, discoverable, and comprehensible. Following these practices, large survey programs increasingly make data management plans, collect metadata and document every stage of research: from conception to analysis.

However, in practice surveys can be inadequately documented due to miscommunication between researchers and archivists resulting in poor planning, which bring time and resource pressures and lead to poor quality data. Data and contextual information can remain hidden and vulnerable: stored on researcher hard-drives or websites, metadata could be incomplete or non-existent, variable and value labels may be cryptic, and do- or syntax-files nowhere to be found. Thus, despite suggestions and standards, effective implementation of data management plans (if existent) remains unfulfilled.

This session brings together two audiences: researchers designing and/or implementing data management plans in survey research, and archivists involved in digital preservation and dissemination of survey data. This session is a forum to discuss and evaluate approaches to research data management, promote common understanding of problems encountered, and discuss means to an end product: reusable data. We have already received expressions of interest in participating from at least seven researchers and archivists from relevant institutions.

We welcome papers from data creators, principal investigators or data managers dealing with theoretical, methodological, and practical problems in research data management in cross-sectional, repeated or longitudinal surveys, as well as papers from archive personnel

Research Data Management for Re-use: Bringing Researchers and Archivists closer 2Dr Alexia Katsanidou
Research data management includes organizing, documenting and validating data to produce long-term re-usable data. Good research data management practice fulfills the King, et al. (1994: 8), requirement of social science that "procedures are public" to verify quality and permit replication. Accordingly, to the fullest extent possible the research community requires access to data and contextual documentation. Funding bodies impose archiving requirements on researchers, and data archives establish standards and procedures to ensure data are preservable, discoverable, and comprehensible. Following these practices, large survey programs increasingly make data management plans, collect metadata and document every stage of research: from conception to analysis.

However, in practice surveys can be inadequately documented due to miscommunication between researchers and archivists resulting in poor planning, which bring time and resource pressures and lead to poor quality data. Data and contextual information can remain hidden and vulnerable: stored on researcher hard-drives or websites, metadata could be incomplete or non-existent, variable and value labels may be cryptic, and do- or syntax-files nowhere to be found. Thus, despite suggestions and standards, effective implementation of data management plans (if existent) remains unfulfilled.

This session brings together two audiences: researchers designing and/or implementing data management plans in survey research, and archivists involved in digital preservation and dissemination of survey data. This session is a forum to discuss and evaluate approaches to research data management, promote common understanding of problems encountered, and discuss means to an end product: reusable data. We have already received expressions of interest in participating from at least seven researchers and archivists from relevant institutions.

We welcome papers from data creators, principal investigators or data managers dealing with theoretical, methodological, and practical problems in research data management in cross-sectional, repeated or longitudinal surveys, as well as papers from archive personnel